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6 Series I Volume VIII- Serial 8 - Pea Ridge

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Page 6 OPERATIONS IN MO., ARK., KANS., AND IND. T. Chapter XVIII.

firing was heard at the position of the main body the Choctaw and Chickasaw regiment was formed and advanced towards the enemy.

The exceeding darkness of the night rendered the relative position of our friends and foes uncertain and restrained the firing on our part until the enemy was within 60 yards of our line. Even then the order to fire was withheld until Colonel James Bourland, of Texas (my volunteers aide on the occasion),and myself rode to the front, and the former called to those approaching, asking if any Texas were there, which was answered by the crack of the enemy's rifles. A brisk fire was then opened by companies I and K, under Captains Welch and Young, and by companies D, E, and G, under Captains Hall, Reynolds, and McCurtain, as they successively took position. After a short but sharp conflict the firing of the enemy ceased, and under cover of the darkness he made good his retreat. About 50 Choctaws and Texans were then sent out, under Actg. Asst. Adjt. General R. W. Lee, to examine the ravine in front and on the flanks, when it was found that the enemy had left the field and retreated in the direction of their camps.

During the action the line was re-enforced by portions of Captains Brinson's, T. G. Berry's, J. E. McCool's, and Stewart's companies, of the Texas regiment, under Lieutenant-Colonel Quayle, and by a few Creeks, under Lieutenant Colonel Chilly McIntosh, Captain Severs, and Lieutenant Berryhill. In the last encounter we had 2 men severely wounded and 1 slightly. Many horses were shot. Our men escaped mainly in consequence of being dismounted and by firing either kneeling or lying down. Our entire loss in the engagement was 1 captain and 5 men killed, 3 severely and 1 slightly wounded, and 1 missing. Prisoners taken since the battle concur in stating the loss of the enemy to have been about 110 killed and wounded.

Soon after daylight on the 20th the main camp of the enemy was entered, and it was found that they had precipitately abandoned it, leaving behind the chief's buggy, 12 wagons, flour, sugar, coffee, salt, &c., besides many cattle and ponies. Hopoeithleyohola's force in the engagement has been variously estimated at from 800 to 1,200 Creeks and Seminoles and 200 to 300 negroes.

The conduct of both officers and men within the scope of my observation was marked by great coolness and courage. I would particularize as worthy of high commendation the conduct of Colonel James Bourland (who kindly volunteered his valuable services on this occasion and at other times); Actg. Asst. Adjt. General R. W. Lee; Majr. Mitchell Laflore; Lieutenant Joseph A. Carroll, acting judgment Choctaw and Chickasaw Mounted Rifles; Capts. O. G. Welch, R. A. Young, and Lem. M. Reynolds, commanding Chickasaw companies, and Capts. Joseph R. Hall and Jackson McCurtain, commanding Choctaw companies, of the Choctaw and Chickasaw Mounted Rifled; Lieutenant-Colonel Quayle and Captains Brinson and McCool, of the Texas regiment; Captain Severs, of the Creek regiment; Lieutenant Colonel Chilly McIntosh, Creek battalion; Lieutenant Samuel Berryhill, of the Creek regiment, and Major J. Jumper, Seminole battalion.

The promptness with which the Choctaws and Chickasaws came into line and the steadiness with which they maintained their position during the entire action merit unqualified praise, especially when it is considered that the night was extremely dark, the number and position of the enemy uncertain,and that they stood for the first time under an enemy's fire.

The following is a list of the killed and wounded: W. J. Lyttle, Captain Welch's squadron Choctaw and Chickasaw regiment, severely


Page 6 OPERATIONS IN MO., ARK., KANS., AND IND. T. Chapter XVIII.

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