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4 Series I Volume XXXVIII-IV Serial 75 - The Atlanta Campaign Part IV

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Page 4 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.


HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,
In the Field, Chattanooga, May 1, 1864.

General ALLEN,

Louisville, Ky.:

I hear that troops are accumulating at Louisville faster than the road can transport them. In that event, give preference to the veterans and if necessary send the new Indiana regiments round by the Cumberland in boats. I believe the Cumberland is in good order.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.


HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,
In the Field, Chattanooga, May 1, 1864.

Colonel DONALDSON,

Nashville, Tenn.:

Reports of 29th and 30th are more than satisfactory. I know that you are doing all that mortal can, and it shall not be my fault if the services are not properly acknowledged in time.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

LOUISVILLE, May 1, 1864.

(Received 4 p. m.)

General MEIGS:

Five months' supplies of all kinds are at Nashville. The great work on this side is nearly done, but done in vain if not followed up with the greatest possible energy and discretion. With limited means the transportation must go forward from Nashville to Chattanooga and follow up the march. Chattanooga is now the vital point; a failure there, and all that is accomplished is a failure. The Senate refuses my confirmation because I am not in the field. I am of too much consequence to go there and of too little to deserve promotion.

R. ALLEN,

Chief Quartermaster.


HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF MISSISSIPPI,
In the Field, Chattanooga, May 1, 1864.

Honorable JAMES GUTHRIE,

Prest. Louisville and Nashville Railroad, Louisville, Ky.:

I am aware of the diminution of your stock, and only ask that you do all that is possible; the next ten days will be the test. We have enough stores at Nashville. We prefer veterans to new troops. Allen might send some of the latter around by boats up the Cumberland. I ask that you do the best possible with your facilities to forward veterans, whose absence breaks up regiments and brigades. I think the emergency would warrant the stoppage of all civil business for ten days. Every car and every locomotive south of Nashville is busy. I think you should deep your repair shops busy night and day. The business of your road will double and quadruple as the Cumberland falls, and your road can well profit by the fact by enlarging its capacity.


Page 4 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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