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6 Series I Volume X-I Serial 10 - Shiloh Part I

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Page 6 KY.,TENN.,N.MISS.,N.ALA.,AND SW.VA. Chapter XXII.

(Crow) is, we fear, mortally wounded. We have taken some guns and horses.

Many thrilling incidents took place that would make my report too long. The white people are treacherous and unreliable, all lying to deceive us. We can only depend on the statements of negroes. No doubt many of our horses will be broken down and worthless by the chase.

I have to report my entire command being eager to meet the enemy, although a very small portion-15 or 20 men in advance-did most of the execution, as we had to move by files through the woods, and that with great difficulty. But for the fact that the enemy placed our teamsters and prisoners between us and themselves we would have done great execution; as it was, we think Morgan got the worst of the attack. Had we ammunition, or our riflemen been in the advance, the list of the killed and wounded would have been very heavy.

Company C had been out all night near La Vergne and 3 miles beyond; the men and horses tired, but they jumped to their guns and saddles when ordered.

We have reason to know we are surrounded with treachery. The prisoners examined lied when examined. Many who take the oath of allegiance only do it to betray us. I have sent out three scouting parties all over the country to recover whatever may be found-stray horses, harness, &c.

Respectfully submitted to you.

JNumbers KENNETT,

Colonel, Commanding.

Brig. General O. M. MITCHEL.


No. 2. Report of Captain John H. Morgan, Kentucky Cavalry (Confederate).

MURFREESBOROUGH, TENN., March 10, 1862.

SIR: With a view of determining the enemy's position and his movements Lieutenant-Colonel Wood, myself, 10 Rangers, and 15 or my squadron left here on the 7th instant at 2 p.m. and proceeded in the direction of Nashville; marching 18 miles, and avoiding the pike, we encamped for the night.

Early on the morning of the 8th, having procured suitable guides, we resumed our march and entered the Federal lines. At about half a mile from a cavalry camp, which we were compelled to pass in full view, we captured 5 men, belonging to the Thirteenth Ohio, Colonel Smith; their arms, Enfield rifles, were also secured. Passing the cavalry camp we continued our march in the direction of Nashville. Having obtained a suitable position in the woods opposite the Lunatic Asylum, where we had a good view of the pike, operations commenced. Seeing a train with its guard approaching, Colonel Wood, myself, and 4 men, wearing United States overcoats, rode down to the pike, stopped the train, and made 23 prisoners. The horses and mules were cut from the wagons and the prisoners mounted and sent back to the party in the woods. This continued until we had accumulated 98 prisoners, among them General Dumont's aide and several other officers. Returning in three parties, with the prisoners, one party, consisting of 60 prisoners and 10 guards, commanded by one of my lieutenants (Owens), was


Page 6 KY.,TENN.,N.MISS.,N.ALA.,AND SW.VA. Chapter XXII.

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