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5 Series I Volume XXXVI-I Serial 67 - Wilderness-Cold Harbor Part I

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Page 5 Chapter XLVIII. GENERAL REPORTS.


HEADQUARTERS,
Near Spotsylvania, May 14, 1864 - 7.10 a. m.

(Received 9.20 a. m., 17th.)

The very heavy rains of the last forty-eight hours have made it almost impossible to move trains or artillery. Two corps were moved last night from our right to the left, with orders to attack at 4 a. m., but owing to the difficulties of the roads, have not fully got into position. This, with the continued bad weather, may prevent offensive operations to-day. Yesterday but little was done, only from 100 to 150 prisoners falling into our hands, without, or almost without loss, on our side.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Chief of Staff.

NEAR SPOTSYLVANIA COURT-HOUSE,

May 15, 1864 - 7 a. m. (Received 10 p. m.)

The very heavy rains of the last three days have rendered the roads so impassable that but little will be done until there is a change of weather, unless the enemy should attack, which they have exhibited but little inclination to do for the last week. I believe it will be better to strengthen the corps here with all re-enforcements coming than to having them formed into separate commands. You need not, therefore, send Augur. Please order Major Morton, engineer, to report to General Burnside.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

Major-General HALLECK,

Washington, D. C.

NEAR SPOTSYLVANIA COURT-HOUSE,

May 16, 1864 - 8 a. m. (Received 3.40 p. m.)

We have had five days' almost constant rain without any prospect yet of its clearing up. The roads have now become so impassable that ambulances with wounded can no longer run between here and Frederiscksburg. All offensive operations necessarily cease until we can have twenty-four hours of dry weather. The army is in the best of spirits and feel greatest confidence in ultimate success. The promptness with which you have forwarded re-enforcements will contribute greatly to diminishing our mortality list and in insuring a complete victory. You can assure the President and Secretary of War that the elements alone have suspended hostilities and that it is in no manner dour to weakness or exhaustion on our part.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Chief of Staff.


Page 5 Chapter XLVIII. GENERAL REPORTS.

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