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8 Series I Volume XXXIV-III Serial 63 - Red River Campaign Part III

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Page 8 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter XLVI.


HEADQUARTERS POST, Lewisburg, Ark., April 1, 1864.

Captain E. D. MASON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

SIR: In obedience to General Orders, Numbers 26, headquarters detachment Seventh Army Corps, Department of Arkansas, Little Rock, March 24, 1864, I have the honor to forward the inclosed report* of my command, located at this post, and respectfully submit the following information regarding matters at this point and surrounding counties: I relieved Lieutenant-Colonel Wells, Fiftieth Indiana Infantry, at this post, agreeably to General Orders, Numbers 26, headquarters Seventh Army Corps, Department of Arkansas, March 11, 1864, having as my command two battalions of the Third Arkansas Cavalry. There being a large amount of Government cotton at the Armstrong and Carroll plantations, 6 miles west of Lewisburg on the river, I was obliged to station one squadron at these points for its protection. There was also a fine grist and saw mill stationed on Cadron River, 15 miles east of Lewisburg, 1 mile from the Arkansas, from which the troops stationed had derived a large amount of breadstuff, and knowing the disadvantages attending the transportation of subsistence stores from Little Rock I deemed it advisable to station a squadron to garrison this point, this leaving me six squadrons to garrison this post.

I found on my arrival very many destitute families in this locality, the majority of them unable to provide for themselves. The I have assisted as far as in my power. My command has been kept actively employed in scouting the country for a distance of from 60 to 120 miles north and west, some of the expeditions having and engagements with the guerrillas, resulting in nearly every instance to our advantage. The country from and above Little Red River to across the Boston Mountains is in a very desolate, unsettled state, full of bushwhackers, thieves, and rebel sympathizers. There are numerous bands of guerrillas in the mountains, reported to be detachments from General McRae's command, who is stationed near White River, with a force of about 600 or 700. These detachments, in numbers of from 20 to 50, are constantly scouring the country in that locality, committing every depredation devisable by the human mind, and, being well mounted, having a thorough knowledge of the country and very many sympathizers and friends, are almost impossible to reach by any scout from this point of such numbers as I am able to send, my picket, provost, and fatigue duty being so heavy that one squadron is all I can spare at any one time. I shall use my utmost endeavors to protect all loyal citizens in every pursuit, and also to bring to justice every enemy of the Government, and any information gained shall be promptly furnished you.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
I. W. FULLER,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Post.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF EASTERN ARKANSAS, Helena, Ark., April 1, 1864.

Brigadier General L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General, U. S. Army:

SIR: Within the last two weeks five midnight raids have been made on the leased plantations south and north of this place, and

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*Not found.

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Page 8 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter XLVI.

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