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6 Series I Volume XXXIV-III Serial 63 - Red River Campaign Part III

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Page 6 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter XLVI.

strength to destroy any boats guerrillas may be gathering, should these reports prove true. The picket at De Sair Station must be vigilant, and any defenses that will prevent a surprise and capture there should be made without delay. Obstructions should be made to the entrance of the little bayou that comes into the railroad at De Sair. Recollect, skiffs cannot come in in the night. Probably felling trees would answer this purpose. Please give your personal attention to these matters.

B. S. ROBERTS,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.


HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, Alexandria, April 1, 1864.

Major General WILLIAM B. FRANKLIN,
Commanding 19th and Detach. 13th Army Corps:

GENERAL: Brigadier General A. J. Smith, with his command, moves up the river early to-morrow morning, and unless obstructed will probably reach Grand Ecore late to-morrow. He will disembark his command at Grand Ecore and be ready to co-operate with you should you need additional force in that neighborhood. Information of not very reliable character was received at these headquarters yesterday evening that the enemy were concentrating at Fort Jesup, and that they intended to attack your flank or rear, or make a dash of cavalry in this direction.

It seems pretty certain that Green's force of cavalry was to have made a junction with Taylor and Walker near Fort Jesup on Wednesday and Thursday, but it is most probable that their intention was to retreat together on the road through Mansfield to Shreveport. With the addition to his force of Green's cavalry, Taylor will be enabled to more respectably cover his retreat than he otherwise could have done. Boats containing 190,000 rations for your command have passed the rapids, and accompany General Smith's transport fleet. Considerable forage has also gone forward. The major-general commanding will leave this to-morrow for Grand Ecore.

Very respectfully, I am, general, your most obedient servant,

CHAS. P. STONE,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff.


HEADQUARTERS FORCES IN WESTERN LOUISIANA, Eight miles from Natchitoches, April 1, 1864-10.30 p. m.

Brigadier General A. L. LEE,
Commanding Cavalry, Department of the Gulf:

GENERAL: I have received your dispatches of 5 and 7 p. m. I wish that to-morrow you will send out the bulk of your force, in fact all that is available, to find out where the enemy is and feel him severely. The whole of my force will be at Natchitoches to-morrow, so that your whole train, except such as is necessary for one or two days' consumption, can be left at Natchitoches. I am unable to form any idea of the truth of the story of Steele's scouts, for I do not know what arrangements were made with regard to co-operation with him or by him. I shall be in town to-morrow by 11 o'clock a. m.

Respectfully, yours,

W. B. FRANKLIN,

Major-General, Commanding.


Page 6 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter XLVI.

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