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8 Series I Volume XXXIV-I Serial 61 - Red River Campaign Part I

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Page 8 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter XLVI.

June 16, 1864.-Major General Joseph J. Reynolds, U. S. Army, assigned to command of the forces being assembled at Morganza, La., to operate against Mobile, Ala.

Skirmish at West Point, Ark.

Affair on Big North Fork Creek, near Preston, Mo.

16-17, 1864.-Expedition from Fort Leavenworth, Kans., to Farley, &c., Mo.

16-20, 1864.-Expedition from Kansas into Missouri.

17, 1864.-Skirmish near Columbia, Mo.

Skirmish on the Monticello Road, near Pine Bluff, Ark.

18, 1864.-Brigadier General Thomas W. Sherman, U. S. Army, assumes command of the Defenses of New Orleans.

18-19, 1864.-Descent on Laclede, Mo., and pursuit of the raiders.

18-20, 1864.-Scout from Kansas City, Mo.

19, 1864.-Affair at Bayou Grossetete, La.

Affair at Eagle Pass, Tex.

Skirmish at Hahn's Farm, near Waldron, Ark.

Skirmish at Iron Bridge, Ind. T.

19-25, 1864.-Scout from Mount Vernon, Mo.

20-23, 1864.-Scouts from Lewisburg, Ark.

20-24, 1864.-Scout from Cassville, Mo., to Cross Hollow, Ark.

20-29, 1864.-Operations on the White River, Ark.

24, 1864.-Affair near Fayetteville, Ark.

25, 1864.-Skirmish at Rancho Las Rinas, Tex.

Affair at Point Pleasant, La.

26, 1864.-Affair near the Sedalia and Marshall Road, Mo.

27-28, 1864.-Affairs near Dunksburg, Mo.

27-29, 1864.-Scout from Brownsville, Ark.

29, 1864.-Skirmish at Meffleton Lodge, Ark.

Skirmish at Davis' Bend, La.

GENERAL REPORT.

Report of Lieutenant General U. S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding Armies of the United States, of operations March, 1864-May, 1865.


HEADQUARTERS ARMIES OF THE UNITED STATES,
Washington, D. C., July 22, 1865.

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the armies of the United States from the date of my appointment to command the same:

From an early period in the rebellion I had been impressed with the idea that active and continuous operations of all the troops that could be brought into the field, regardless of season and weather, were necessary to a speedy termination of the war. The resources of the enemy and his numerical strength were far inferior to ours; but as an offset to this, we had a vast territory, with a population hostile to the Government, to garrison, and long lines of river and railroad communications to protect, to enable us to supply the operating armies.

The armies in the East and West acted independently and without concert, like a balky team, no two ever pulling together, enabling the enemy to use to great advantage his interior lines of communication for transportating troops from east to west, re-enforcing the


Page 8 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter XLVI.

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