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7 Series I Volume XXXIII- Serial 60 - New Berne

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Page 7 Chapter XLV. OPERATIONS IN HAMPSHIRE AND HARDY CO. 'S, W. VA.

densville, at which point, I presume, they will form a junction, then proceed to the valley, and reach Early at Strasburg or Mount Jackson:

ROMNEY, W. VA.

January 8, 1864

Brigadier-General KELLEY:

Arrived safely. No enemy in or about Romney since Wednesday evening. The force that left Romney Wednesday evening was commanded by Fitzhugh Lee and Rosser- 1,500 cavalry; no artillery. They had left their artillery above Moorefield. They went by Grassy Lick road. They had pressed some teams at Romney. The teams got back to-day to Romney. The left rear of rebel force at 12 o'clock yesterday was on Wardensville and Moorefield pike. This force is said to be greatly demoralized. Several of their men froze to death on the road. General Fitzhugh Lee very badly frozen. They were much alarmed; afraid they would be cut off by your forces from Martinsburg.

MYERS.

Lieutenant, Commanding Scouts.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General,

Brigadier-General CULLUM,

Chief of Staff.

CUMBERLAND, January 9, 1864.

We have been threatened for several days by a large cavalry force under command of General Fitzhugh Lee, but he has now retreated toward the Shenandoah Valley, having been foiled in all of his attempts to take any of our outposts or to capture any public stores, or to inflict any damage on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The raid of Major-General Early on us, in retaliation for the active movements of the troops in this department, has thus far been a complete failure. The railroad is perfectly safe, trains making regular trips from Baltimore to Wheeling and Parkersburg.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.

Major-General BROOKS.


Numbers 2. Report of Major General Fitzhugh Lee, C. S. Army, commanding expedition.


HEADQUARTERS LEE'S CAVALRY DIVISION,
January 11, 1864.

GENERAL: I have the honor to report, as subsequent to a preceding report of my operations while under your command, that I left Mount Jackson upon December 31, 1863, and marched to Moorefield across North Mountain on the Orkney Springs road. Found the mountain so steep in the ascent and descent that my artillery and a train of wagons from the Valley quartermaster's department were unable to follow, and results which were expected to ensue from their presence, of course, could not in their absence be realized. At Moorefield learned that the force of 800 or 900 of the enemy still remained at Petersburg. Reconnoitered and found that they were intrenched with abatis. The greater part of my ammunition being wet, owing to starting in a snow and rain storm, and having no artillery, I decided not to attack them, and moved upon their line of communication toward New Creek Depot. Captured a train of


Page 7 Chapter XLV. OPERATIONS IN HAMPSHIRE AND HARDY CO. 'S, W. VA.

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