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30 Series I Volume I- Serial 1 - Charleston

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Page 30 OPERATIONS IN CHARLESTON HARBOR, S. C. Chapter I.

In conclusion, I am happy to state that the troops, both officers and soldiers, of the Regulars, Volunteers, Militia, and Navy, by their energy, zeal, perseverance, labor, and endurance before the attack, and by their courage and gallantry during its continuance, exhibited all the characteristics of the best troops; and to my staff, Regular and Volunteer, I am much indebted for the prompt and complete execution of my orders, which had to be communicated in open boats during the bombardment to the different batteries then engaged.

I remain, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Honorable L. P. WALKER,

Secretary of War, Montgomery, Ala.


HEADQUARTERS PROVISIONAL ARMY, C. S.,
Charleston, S. C., April 27, 1861.

SIR: I have the honor to transmit to the Department with this my detailed report of the operations conducted during the bombardment of Fort Sumter, accompanied by copies of the reports sent in to this office by the commandants of batteries, together with a series of photographs (twenty-two in number), showing the condition of Forts Sumter and Moultrie and of the floating battery after the surrender of the former fort.*

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Honorable L. P. WALKER,

Secretary of War, Montgomery, Ala.


HEADQUARTERS PROVISIONAL ARMY,
Charleston, S. C., April 27, 1861.

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following detailed report of the bombardment and surrender of Fort Sumter and the incidents connected therewith:

Having completed my channel defenses and batteries in the harbor necessary for the reduction of Fort Sumter, I dispatched two of my aides at 2.20 p.m., on Thursday, the 11th of April, with a communication to Major Anderson, in command of the fortification, demanding its evacuation. I offered to transport himself and command to any port in the United States he might elect, to allow him to move out of the fort with company arms and property and all private property, and to salute his flag in lowering it. He refused to accede to the demand. As my aides were about leaving Major Anderson remarked that if we did not batter him to pieces he would be starved out in a few days, or words to that effect. This being reported to me by my aides on their return with his refusal, at 5.10 p.m., I deemed it proper to telegraph the purport of his remark to the Secretary of War. In reply I received by telegraph the following instructions at 9.10 p.m.: "Do not desire needlessly to bombard Fort Sumter. If Major Anderson will state the time at which, as indicated by him, he will evacuate, and agree that in the mean time he will not use his guns against us unless should be employed against Fort Sumter, you are authorized thus to avoid effusion of blood. If this, or its equivalent, be refused, reduce the fort as your judgment decides to be most practicable."

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*The photographs not found.

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Page 30 OPERATIONS IN CHARLESTON HARBOR, S. C. Chapter I.

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